USMLE Step 1 Neuroanatomy Review 27 06 The Lateral Medullary Syndrome

USMLE Step 1 Neuroanatomy Review 27 06 The Lateral Medullary Syndrome

 

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Play USMLE Audio MP3 27 06 The Lateral Medullary Syndrome Below

Begin 27 06 The Lateral Medullary Syndrome Transcription

Student doctor, what syndrome results from the occlusion of the vertebral artery or one of its medullary branches such as the posterior inferior cerebellar artery?

  • The lateral medullary syndrome.

What are the symptoms of the lateral medullary syndrome?

  • I’m going to group these for you.  First, the contralateral symptoms.
  • The contralateral symptoms of the lateral medullary syndrome are the contralateral loss of pain and temperature sensation from the trunk and extremities and the ipsilateral symptoms.  There’s quite a list here, so please pause if you wish.
  • The ipsilateral symptoms of the lateral medullary syndrome include loss of pain and temperature sensation from the face, ipsilateral paralysis of the larynx, pharynx, and palate, ipsilateral Horner’s syndrome, and ipsilateral dystaxia, dysmetria, and dysdiadokinesia.

All right, what about symptoms that are not ipsilateral nor contralateral?

  • Other symptoms of the lateral medullary syndrome include loss of the gag reflex, nystagmus, nausea, vomiting, and vertigo.

Let’s turn these around.  What syndrome is described by the following symptoms: Contralateral loss of pain and temperature sensation from the trunk and extremities, the ipsilateral loss of pain and temperature sensation from the face, ipsilateral paralysis of the larynx, pharynx, and palate, ipsilateral Horner’s syndrome ipsilateral dystaxia, dysmetria, and dysdiadokinesia, and loss of gag reflex, nystagmus, nausea, vomiting, and vertigo?

  • This is the lateral medullary syndrome.

And from occlusion of what artery or arteries does the lateral medullary syndrome usually arise?

  • From the occlusion of the vertebral artery or one of its medullary branches such as the posterior inferior cerebellar artery.

And just to review, what occlusion, of what artery, usually gives rise to the medial medullary syndrome?

  • The anterior spinal artery.

 

****END OF TRANSCRIPTION****

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